Traveling today often means getting away from our digital lifestyles - and talking about it on social media channels. This Blog marks these two poles: Analog camping equipment and digital companions.

Camping equipment

Let's start with the more crucial part: Always having a warm and dry place to stay. We brought a tent that can be set up quickly and without getting wet on the inside if it happens to be raining. Of course, it can't be too large or two heavy. After a longer research we chose the Exped Orion III.

The large vestibules offer a lot of space for storing boots and bags. 

The large vestibules offer a lot of space for storing boots and bags. 

We use self-inflating sleeping pads from Therm-a-Rest. We got rather comfortable ones, which are a bit heavier and bigger. As sleeping bags we brought a thin cotton-bedtick, which is great for high temperatures and sometimes also makes you feel better in budget hostels. For medium and lower temperatures we use down feather sleeping bags. They have a nice feel and are small when compressed. For very low temperatures we carry an additional thermo liner.

Not too hot, not too cold at any temperature: Bringing one medium-warmth sleeping bag and two small liners worked very well for us.

Not too hot, not too cold at any temperature: Bringing one medium-warmth sleeping bag and two small liners worked very well for us.

In order to cook small meals while camping you should bring a multi-fuel camp-stove, since gas-cartridges are not available everywhere. We are happy with our MSR WhisperLite International.

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You can use your panniers to sit on, but we are happy about the chairs we brought: comfortable to sit on, small and lightweight when folded. You can get them from Helinox, but there are also almost identical and much cheaper ones available.

Sooner or later, the pannier-guys always envy the chair-guys. Scene from Mongolia with our friends Peter, Florian and Ulli.

Sooner or later, the pannier-guys always envy the chair-guys. Scene from Mongolia with our friends Peter, Florian and Ulli.

Travelers' Electronics

You might want to escape the digital on a trip like this. You might find out you rather don't. If you are blogging you will most likely need a laptop. A rather cheap one will do, its just important to have a shock-proof SSD instead of a regular hard disk.

Did we really just write "a rather cheap one will do"?! Ours was in fact too cheap and too slow.

Did we really just write "a rather cheap one will do"?! Ours was in fact too cheap and too slow.

We also brought e-readers, which has proven to be a great decision: all you can read, cheap and light-weight. Get a back-lit one for reading in your tent. Lonely Planet guidebooks are still very helpful for finding hostels, sights and other places, as well as for quick background information. However, if you do not want to carry a stack of hard-copies with you put the electronic versions on your smart phone.

Two Screenshots of the online-Version of the Lonely Planet for Russia, running in Amazon's Kindle-App.

Two Screenshots of the online-Version of the Lonely Planet for Russia, running in Amazon's Kindle-App.

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Another recommendation besides bringing an e-reader: Use it to read "At Swim-Two-Birds"!

Another recommendation besides bringing an e-reader: Use it to read "At Swim-Two-Birds"!

Last but not least, we brought a compact digital camera. It is a good idea to test whether you can easily export the pictures to your laptop (in case you publish a blog e.g.) or smart phone (for Instagram or WhatsApp) in case you wish to do so.

Most pictures in this blog were taken with our Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100, some with an Apple iPhone 6S.

Most pictures in this blog were taken with our Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100, some with an Apple iPhone 6S.

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